Eyeworld CME Supplements

EW JAN/FEB 2020_Supported by an unrestricted education grant from Avedro, Avellino Labs, Dompé, and Johnson & Johnson Vision

This is a supplement to EyeWorld Magazine that doctors can take a test after reading and receive CME credits for.

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Investigating challenges to diagnosis and treatment of significant corneal disorders The 2018 ASCRS Clinical Survey reveals current practices in corneal management I t is important to diagnose and manage corneal disor- ders, however, patients may face a range of challenges in obtaining treatment. According to the 2018 ASCRS Clinical Survey, 55% of non-U.S. surgeons and only 14% of U.S. surgeons performed corneal crosslink- ing in 2018. With advances in technology, I anticipate more surgeons will perform corneal crosslinking in the future. Still, nearly 60% reported that they have no plans to perform cor- neal crosslinking procedures. U.S. respondents were more than twice as likely to report continued on page 2 Accreditation Statement This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint providership of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) and EyeWorld magazine. ASCRS is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Educational Objectives • Describe the impact of degenerative and dystrophic corneal disease on visual quality, surgical outcomes, and patient lifestyle • Compare and contrast the latest diagnostic and therapies modalities to detect and treat irregular, weakened, and diseased corneas • Develop best practices and individualized treatment plans to optimize outcomes for these unique cases Designation Statement The American Society of Cataract and Refractive Sur- gery designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits ™ . Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Notice of Off-Label Use Presentations This activity may include presentations on drugs or devices or uses of drugs or devices that may not have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or have been approved by the FDA for specific uses. Claiming Credit To claim credit, participants must visit bit.ly/2Lrwzp3 to review content and download the post-activity test and credit claim. All participants must pass the post-activity test with score of 75% or higher to earn credit. Alternatively, the post-test form included in this supplement may be mailed or emailed in for credit to be awarded, and a certificate will be mailed within 2 weeks. When viewing online or downloading the material, standard internet access is required. Adobe Acrobat Reader is needed to view the materials. CME credit is valid through June 30, 2020. CME credit will not be awarded after that date. Financial Interest Disclosures Brandon Ayres, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from Alcon, Allergan, Microsurgical Technology, and Omeros. He is a member of the speaker's bureau for Bausch + Lomb and Bio-Tissue. Sonia Yoo, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from Allergan and Carl Zeiss Meditec. She has received research support from Avedro and Avellino. Terry Kim, MD, has an investment interest in and has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from Avellino, CorneaGen, Eyenovia, Kala Pharmaceuticals, NovaBay, Ocular Therapeutix, Omeros, Presbyopia Therapies, and Simple Contacts. He has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from Aerie Pharmaceuticals, Alcon, Allergan, Avedro, Bausch + Lomb, Blephex, Dompe, Johnson & Johnson Vision, Shire, Sight Sciences, and Carl Zeiss Meditec. Elizabeth Yeu, MD, has an investment interest in Mynosys, Modernizing Medicine, and Ocular Science. She has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from Alcon, Allergan, Aurea, Bausch + Lomb, Bio-Tissue, BVI, EyePoint, GuidePoint, iOptics, Johnson & Johnson Vision, Kala Pharmaceuticals, Merk, Mynosys, Ocular Therapeutix, OcuSoft, Omeros, Precision Lens, Science Based Health, Shire, TearLab, and Carl Zeiss Meditec. She is a member of the speaker's bureau for Alcon, Allergan, Bio-Tissue, iOptics, Johnson & Johnson Vision, Shire, and TearLab. She has received research support from Bio-Tissue, iOptics, Kala Pharmaceuticals, Ocular Science, TearLab, and TopCon. Staff member Kate Fehlhaber, PhD, has no ophthal- mic-related financial disclosures. Supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Avedro, Avellino Labs, Dompe, and Johnson & Johnson Vision. Terry Kim, MD New approaches to the diagnosis and management of important corneal disorders in the cataract and refractive surgery patient ASCRS by Terry Kim, MD this compared with non-U.S. respondents (76% U.S., 31%, non-U.S.). When asked what condi- tions they were treating with crosslinking, 90% responded using it for keratoconus. When they were asked about their barriers to using corneal crosslinking, inadequate or uncertain reimbursement was a problem for 75% of U.S. Figure 1 Source: 2018 ASCRS Clinical Survey Which of the following have been significant barriers to you performing corneal collagen crosslinking? U.S.: Reimbursement (75%) and approval status (40%) Non-U.S.: Lack of patients/referrals (42%) and reimbursement (33%) Labeling or regulatory approval status Inadequate or uncertain reimbursement Staff or practice logistics Lack of patient population or lack of referrals from primary eyecare providers All U.S. Non-U.S. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%

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