Eyeworld CME Supplements

EW MAR 2015 - Supported by unrestricted educational grant from Abbott Medical Optics

This is a supplement to EyeWorld Magazine that doctors can take a test after reading and receive CME credits for.

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by Richard L. Lindstrom, MD Status report on the continuum toward super vision, phaco-less cataract surgery, and presbyopia correction without compromise T he American Society of Cat- aract & Refractive Surgery has initiated a large clinical survey of more than 1,500 surgeons to assess clinical opinions and practice patterns. The 2014 survey resulted in 268 data points, 137 questions, and it has allowed us to look at some of the unmet needs in regard to education. This activity, "Three tipping points in refractive cataract surgery: A sta- tus report on the continuum toward super vision, phaco-less cataract surgery, and presbyopia correction without compromise," was created because of the survey respondents' results. ASCRS has always had a goal of developing educational content that closes gaps in knowledge. We have traditionally used audience response questions to achieve that goal, and ASCRS has now created what I believe to be the most com- pelling programs that address some of the more controversial issues facing our membership. Laser-assisted cataract surgery is certainly among those topics. The 2014 ASCRS Clinical Survey 1 found most members do not believe laser- assisted cataract surgery provides any improvement over conventional cataract surgery, in capsulorhexis, lens fragmentation, or arcuate inci- sions. A good 35% of respondents say we don't have enough data to have a strong opinion. When it comes to presbyopia correction, the majority of respon- dents believe the current iteration of IOLs provides good near and distance vision, but intermediate vision is not as acceptable. Almost a quarter of us do not assess outcomes with our laser vision correction patients, and 63.6% believe "success" is the percentage of patients with 20/20 vision. Yet the advances in laser vision correction technology can generate visual acui- ty significantly better than 20/20. Reference 1. ASCRS Clinical Survey 2014. Global Trends in Ophthalmology. Fairfax, VA: American Society of Cataract & Refractive Surgery, 2014. Accreditation Statement This activity has been planned and imple- mented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint providership of the American Society of Cataract & Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) and EyeWorld. ASCRS is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Educational Objectives Ophthalmologists who participate in this course will: • Discuss the quantity and quality of the avail- able literature and studies demonstrating the key outcome differences between LACS and conventional cataract surgery, astigmatism management, effective lens position, effective phaco time/energy; • Identify the new level of diagnostic informa- tion that can be obtained and treated on both the cornea and the entire optical system to better understand the minute aberrations that impact the origins of patients' visual quality and satisfaction, and demonstrate the benefits and practice implications of assessing LVC outcomes beyond 20/20 UCVA; and • Increase knowledge of the clinical impact of both chromatic aberration and depth of focus, to improve proper lens selection and maximize the visual quality in today's presbyopic patients. Designation Statement The American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery designates this educa- tional activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits.™ Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Claiming Credit To claim credit, participants must visit bit.ly/1CIMels to review content and download the post-activity test and credit claim. All participants must pass the post- activity test with a score of 75% or higher to earn credit. Alternatively, the post-test form included in this supplement may be faxed to the number indicated for credit to be awarded, and a certificate will be mailed within 2 weeks. When viewing online or downloading the material, standard Internet access is required. Adobe Acrobat Reader is needed to view the materials. CME credit is valid through September 30, 2015. CME credit will not be awarded after that date. Notice of Off-Label Use Presentations This activity may include presentations on drugs or devices or uses of drugs or devices that may not have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or have been approved by the FDA for specific uses only. ADA/Special Accommodations ASCRS and EyeWorld fully comply with the legal requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the rules and regulations thereof. Any participant in this educational activity who requires special accommodations or services should contact Laura Johnson at ljohnson@ascrs.org or 703-591-2220. Financial Interest Disclosures Mark Blecher, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from Abbott Medical Optics. Steven J. Dell, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from: Abbott Medical Optics, Allergan, Bausch + Lomb, Ocular Therapeutix, Optical Express, Tracey Technologies, and Wavetec Vision Systems Inc. He has an investment interest in Tracey Technologies and Wavetec Vision Systems Inc. Dr. Dell has received research funding from Wavetec Vision Systems Inc. Richard L. Lindstrom, MD, has an investment interest in and received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from: Abbott Medical Optics, AcuFocus Inc., AqueSys, Bausch + Lomb, Biosyntrx, Calhoun Vision Inc., Clarity Ophthalmics, EBV Partners, EGG Basket Ventures, Encore, Envision Photogra- phy, Eyemaginations, Foresight Venture Fund #3, Glaukos Corporation, High Performance Optics, Improve Your Vision, LENSAR, LenSx, Lifeguard Health, Minnesota Eye Consultants, NuLens, Ocular Optics, Ocular Therapeu- tix, Omega Eye Health, Pixel Optics, Quest, Refractec, RevitalVision, Schroder Life Science Venture Fund, SightPath, Surgijet/Visijet, 3D Vision Systems, TLC Vision, TearLab, Tracey Technologies, Transcend Medical Inc., Vision Solutions Technologies. He has an investment interest in Confluence Acquisition Partners Inc., Curveright LLC, CXL Ophthalmics LLC, Evision Medical laser, Fziomed, HEAVEN Fund, Healthcare Transaction Services, Nisco, OnPoint, One Focus Ventures, Rainwater Healthcare, Revision Optics, SarboxNP, SARcode Corporation, Solbeam, TriPrima, Viradax, and Wavetec Vision Systems Inc. Dr. Lindstrom has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from: Adoptics, Advanced Refractive Technologies, Elenza, ForSight, Hoya Surgical Optics, ISTA Pharmaceuticals, Lumineyes Inc., OSN/SLACK, Omeros Corp., Seros Medical LLC, SRxA, and Versant. He received royalties from AcuFocus Inc., Bausch + Lomb, and Quest. John A. Vukich, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from: Abbott Medical Optics, Alcon Laboratories, Allergan, Bausch + Lomb, Bioptigen, Carl Zeiss Meditec, OptiMedica Corporation, Transcend Medical. He has received research funding from Abbott Medical Optics, Allergan, Avedro, Genentech. Staff coordinators Brad Fundingsland, Laura Johnson, and Erin Schallhorn have no oph- thalmic-related financial interests to disclose. Three tipping points in refractive cataract surgery Supplement to EyeWorld March 2015 Supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Abbott Medical Optics Richard L. Lindstrom, MD Dr. Lindstrom is founder and attending surgeon at Minnesota Eye Consultants in Minneapolis. He can be contacted at rllindstrom@mneye.com. Click to read and claim CME credit

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