Eyeworld CME Supplements

EW_FEB 2016 Supported by unrestricted educational grants from TearLab, TearScience, and RPS

This is a supplement to EyeWorld Magazine that doctors can take a test after reading and receive CME credits for.

Issue link: http://cmesupplements.eyeworld.org/i/628506

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Supported by ..... continued on page 2 Supplement to EyeWorld February 2016 Medical Optics, Allergan, Shire Pharmaceuticals, and TearScience. Edward J. Holland, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees or other consulting income from and is a member of the speakers bureaus of: Alcon Laboratories, Bausch + Lomb, Kala Company, Mati Therapeutics, RPS, Senju Pharmaceuticals, and TearLab. He has received a retainer, ad hoc fees or other consulting income from Shire Pharmaceuticals and TearScience. Dr. Holland has received research funding from: Alcon Laboratories, Mati Pharmaceuticals, PRN, and Senju Pharmaceuticals, and has received travel expense reimbursement from: Alcon Laboratories and Bausch + Lomb. Christopher E. Starr, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees or other consulting income from and is a member of the speakers bureaus of Allergan and Bausch + Lomb. He is a member of the speakers bureau of Alcon Laboratories and has received a retainer, ad hoc fees or other consulting income from Nicox. Dr. Starr has re- ceived a retainer, ad hoc fees or other consulting income and research funding from RPS. He has an investment interest in, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees or other consulting income from, and is a member of the speakers bureau of TearLab. Staff members: Kristen Covington, Laura Johnson, and Erin Schallhorn have no ophthalmic-related financial interests. Accreditation Statement This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and pol- icies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint providership of the American Society of Cataract & Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) and EyeWorld. ASCRS is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Educational Objectives Ophthalmologists who participate in this activity will: • Recognize symptoms and relate common ocular surface problems and their consequences for optical image quality to reduced outcomes in refractive cataract surgery; • Identify strategies and processes to integrate new tools for evaluating ocular surface health into routine preoperative protocols, with the goal of making faster and more accurate diagnoses to guide treatment decisions; and • Develop protocols and construct treatment plans that not only provide symptomatic relief, but also improve the health of the ocular surface and tear film sufficiently to result in accurate preoperative testing and optimize visual out- comes of surgery. Designation Statement The American Society of Cataract & Refractive Surgery designates this enduring materials edu- cational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. ™ Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Claiming Credit To claim credit, participants must visit bit.ly/1Ritaqt to review content and download the post-activity test and credit claim. All participants must pass the post-activity test with a score of 75% or higher to earn credit. Alternatively, the post-test form included in this supplement may be faxed to the number indicated for credit to be awarded, and a certificate will be mailed within 2 weeks. When viewing online or downloading the material, standard Internet access is required. Adobe Acrobat Reader is needed to view the materials. CME credit is valid through August 31, 2016. CME credit will not be awarded after that date. Notice of Off-Label Use Presentations This activity may include presentations on drugs or devices or uses of drugs or devices that may not have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or have been approved by the FDA for specific uses only. ADA/Special Accommodations ASCRS and EyeWorld fully comply with the legal requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the rules and regulations thereof. Any participant in this educational program who requires special accommodations or services should contact Laura Johnson at ljohnson@ ascrs.org or 703-591-2220. Financial Interest Disclosures Eric D. Donnenfeld, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees or other consulting income from: Abbott Medical Optics Inc., AcuFocus Inc., Alcon Laboratories Inc., Allergan, AqueSys Inc., Bausch + Lomb, CRST, Elenza, Glaukos Corporation, Icon Biosciences, Kala Pharmaceuticals, Katena, Mati Pharmaceuticals, Merck & Co. Inc., Mimetogen Pharmaceuticals USA Inc., NovaBay, OcuHub, Odyssey Medical Inc., Omeros Corporation, Pfizer Inc., PRN, RPS, Shire Pharmaceuticals, Strathspey Crown, TearLab, and TCL. Alice T. Epitropoulos, MD, is a member of the speakers bureaus of: Allergan, Bausch + Lomb, NovaBay, PRN, Shire Pharmaceuticals, TearLab, and TearScience. She has received research funding from Bausch + Lomb, Ocular Therapeutix, PRN, and TearLab. Dr. Epitropoulos has received travel expense reimbursement from Bausch + Lomb and TearScience, and earns a royalty or derives other financial gain from Eye Care & Cure. Marjan Farid, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees or other consulting income from: Abbott Navigating OSD treatments, technologies, and techniques for today's refractive cataract practice In light of the many new ad- vances in ocular surface dysfunc- tion (OSD) diagnostics, the ASCRS Cornea Clinical Committee is of surgery in which patients have high expectations for postoper- ative vision—including cataract surgery with and without premi- um intraocular lenses (IOLs). D uring the last decade, surgeons have become increasingly aware of the role of the ocular surface after any type Protocols help surgeons diagnose and treat ocular surface dysfunction before cataract surgery by Christopher Starr, MD Implementing new ocular surface diagnostics and therapeutics: protocols for success Christopher Starr, MD Figure 1. Survey respondents reported the percentage of their cataract surgery patients presenting for their preoperative consult with sufficient ocular surface dysfunction to require treatment beyond artificial tears. 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0 All U.S. Non U.S. <20% 21–40% 41–60% >60% Average Pct All 21% U.S. 22% Non U.S. 21% Supported by unrestricted educational grants from TearLab, TearScience, and RPS Click to read and claim CME credit

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