Eyeworld CME Supplements

EW_AUG 2016 Supported by Abbott Medical Optics and Bausch + Lomb

This is a supplement to EyeWorld Magazine that doctors can take a test after reading and receive CME credits for.

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continued on page 2 EyeWorld August 2016 Supported by Abbott Medical Optics and Bausch + Lomb Accreditation Statement This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint providership of the American Society of Cataract & Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) and EyeWorld. ASCRS is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Designation Statement The American Society of Cataract & Refractive Surgery designates this enduring materials educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. ™ Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Educational Objectives Ophthalmologists who participate in this activity will be able to: • Discuss the quantity and quality of the most recent (6–12 months) available litera- ture and studies demonstrating: safety and efficacy of LACS compared to conventional cataract surgery Claiming Credit To claim credit, participants may visit bit.ly/29BmGSU to review content and download the post-activity test and credit claim. All participants must pass the post-activity test with a score of 75% or higher to earn credit. Alternatively, the post- test form included in this monograph may be faxed to the number indicated for credit to be awarded, and a certificate will be mailed within 2 weeks. When viewing on- line or downloading the material, standard Internet access is required. Adobe Acrobat Reader is needed to view the materials. CME credit is valid through February 28, 2017. CME credit will not be awarded after that date. Notice of Off-Label Use Presentations This activity may include presentations on drugs or devices or uses of drugs or devices that may not have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or have been approved by the FDA for specific uses only. ADA/Special Accommodations ASCRS and EyeWorld fully comply with the legal requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the rules and regulations thereof. Any participant in this educational program who requires special accommodations or services should contact Laura Johnson at ljohnson@ascrs.org or 703-591-2220. Financial Interest Disclosures Eric Donnenfeld, MD, has an investment interest in and has received a retainer, ad hoc fees or other consulting income from: Abbott Medical Optics, AcuFocus, Alcon Laboratories, Allergan, AqueSys, Bausch + Lomb, Beaver Visitec International, CRST, Glaukos, Icon Bioscience, Kala Pharmaceuticals, Katena, Mati Pharmaceuticals, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Mimetogen, NovaBay Pharmaceuticals, Novaliq, OcuHub, Odyssey, Omeros, Pfizer, PRN, RPS, Shire, and Straths. Sumit (Sam) Garg, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from: Abbott Medical Optics, Allergan, IBMD, RPS, and Shire. He is a member of the speakers bureaus of Allergan and Shire. Kerry Solomon, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from and is a member of the speakers bureaus of: Alcon Laboratories and Glaukos. He has received research funding and travel reim- bursement from Alcon. Dr. Solomon has an investment interest in AqueSys, Glaukos, and Mati Therapeutics. William Trattler, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from: Abbott Medical Optics, Allergan, Bausch + Lomb, LENSAR, and TrueVision Systems. He is a member of the speakers bureaus of and has received travel reimbursement from Allergan and Bausch + Lomb, and is a member of the speakers bureau of Oculus. Dr. Trattler has an investment interest in Alphaeon and CXLO. Robert Weinstock, MD, has received a retainer, ad hoc fees, or other consulting income from: Abbott Medical Optics, Alcon, Bausch + Lomb, i-Optics, LENSAR, Omeros, STAAR Surgical, and TrueVision Systems. He is a member of the speakers bureaus of Alcon and Bausch + Lomb and has received travel reimbursement from Bausch + Lomb. Dr. Weinstock has an investment interest in: Calhoun Vision, DigiHealth, Doctor's Allergy, RPS, and TrueVision Systems. Staff members: Laura Johnson and Erin Schallhorn have no ophthalmic-related financial interests. Laser-assisted cataract surgery (LACS) 365 Curriculum What does the data say? Safety, efficacy, and clinical outcomes of laser-assisted cataract surgery time and power compared with the larger pattern. 4 Reduced energy translates into less endothelial cell dam- age, and a reduction in phaco time means less corneal trauma, reduced risk of posterior capsular tears, the ability to use irrigation investigators continue to study this. 2 Research has clearly shown that lens fragmentation with the femtosecond laser offers an im- proved ability to soften the lens with dramatically less energy. 3 Re- searchers showed that the smaller phacoemulsification pattern de- creased the phacoemulsification The femtosecond laser increases precision and accuracy during cataract surgery L aser-assisted cataract sur- gery (LACS) has 3 goals— to improve refractive out- comes, improve the safety of surgery, and increase patient comfort and satisfaction. This is achieved by creat- ing more precise and accurate capsulotomies, cataract incisions, and relaxing incisions and by disrupting and removing the lens more efficiently. A closer look A variety of studies have shown that laser capsulotomies are more round, more accurate, and more precise (Figure 1). 1 This may play a significant role in improving the effective lens position, although by Eric Donnenfeld, MD Laser-assisted cataract surgery at 30,000 feet: Examining clinical aspects as seen in the literature Practice pearl: Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract sur- gery has shown tremendous improvement since it became clinically available 5 years ago. The improvements in lens softening, capsulotomies, arcuate incisions, and primary cataract incisions offer all oph- thalmologists the opportunity to become refractive cataract surgeons and increase the safety and precision of cataract surgery for our patients. –Eric Donnenfeld, MD Figure 1. Manual versus femtosecond capsulotomies Manual capsulorhexis Laser capsulotomy

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